The birth of the Republic of Texas remembered

by | Apr 19, 2016 | Latest

The Daughters of the Republic of Texas (DRT) will join area leaders and organizations in commemorating the 180th anniversary of the Battle of San Jacinto on Thursday, April 21, 2016. The ceremony will take place at 11 a.m. on the south side of the San Jacinto Monument at the San Jacinto Battleground (3523 Independence Pkwy., La Porte, TX 77571).

The event will include delivery of the San Jacinto Battle Report by Nancy Burch, the great-great-granddaughter of General Sam Houston; remarks from former member of the San Jacinto Historical Advisory Board Nina Hendee; performances by the Deer Park High School Orchestra and JROTC Color Guard; presentation of the DRT scholarship winners; an appearance by The Texas Army, the State of Texas Official 1836 Ceremonial and Reenactment Group; and much more.

The famous battle occurred 46 days after the fall of the Alamo in the late afternoon of April 21, 1836. During the battle a Texas army of 910 soldiers led by General Sam Houston overwhelmed the forces of Mexican President and General Santa Anna. When the fighting had ended, more than 600 Mexican soldiers were killed and more than 700 would be captured, while nine Texans would lose their lives. After escaping the battle, Santa Anna would be captured the next day, and three weeks later would be forced to sign the peace treaty granting Texas its independence as a nation.

“The Battle of San Jacinto was the turning point in Texas’ quest for independence and is remembered as one of the most decisive battles of the world,” said Betty Edwards, M.D., President General of the Daughters of the Republic of Texas.

Edwards continued, “The battle gave birth to the Republic of Texas, and its story truly captures the spirit and pride the Lone Star State is recognized for around the world. We are honored to carry on the memory of the brave heroes who were part of this crucial event in our state’s history.”

In 1902 members of the DRT joined a group of dignitaries including legislators and a San Jacinto battle survivor in visiting the site to place temporary improvised monuments in a dozen locations where veterans identified important events had occurred. The locations included the camp where Gen. Houston lay wounded under a tree on the bayou, the same spot where Santa Anna was delivered to him as a captive.

After years of encouragement by the Sons and Daughters of the Republic of Texas, proponents succeeded in raising funds for the construction of the San Jacinto Monument which was completed in 1939. At 567 feet, the monument remains the tallest masonry column in the world. By comparison, the Washington Monument is 555 feet tall.

Acting on behalf of the Texas Veterans Association, in 1940 the Daughters of the Republic of Texas led an effort to place a large bronze sundial on the battlefield in memory of the nine Texans that lost their lives: Benjamin Rice Bringham, Lemuel Stockton Blakey, John C. Hale, George A. Lamb, Dr. William Junius Mottley, Mathias Cooper, Thomas Patton Fowie, Ashley R. Stephens and Olwyn J. Trask.

For more information on the Official San Jacinto Day Ceremony, contact Al Davis at 713-468-6771 [email protected]

For information about the Daughters of the Republic of Texas, visit http://www.drtinfo.org/. The Daughters of the Republic of Texas (DRT) will join area leaders and organizations in commemorating the 180th anniversary of the Battle of San Jacinto on Thursday, April 21, 2016. The ceremony will take place at 11 a.m. on the south side of the San Jacinto Monument at the San Jacinto Battleground (3523 Independence Pkwy., La Porte, TX 77571).

The event will include delivery of the San Jacinto Battle Report by Nancy Burch, the great-great-granddaughter of General Sam Houston; remarks from former member of the San Jacinto Historical Advisory Board Nina Hendee; performances by the Deer Park High School Orchestra and JROTC Color Guard; presentation of the DRT scholarship winners; an appearance by The Texas Army, the State of Texas Official 1836 Ceremonial and Reenactment Group; and much more.

The famous battle occurred 46 days after the fall of the Alamo in the late afternoon of April 21, 1836. During the battle a Texas army of 910 soldiers led by General Sam Houston overwhelmed the forces of Mexican President and General Santa Anna. When the fighting had ended, more than 600 Mexican soldiers were killed and more than 700 would be captured, while nine Texans would lose their lives. After escaping the battle, Santa Anna would be captured the next day, and three weeks later would be forced to sign the peace treaty granting Texas its independence as a nation.

“The Battle of San Jacinto was the turning point in Texas’ quest for independence and is remembered as one of the most decisive battles of the world,” said Betty Edwards, M.D., President General of the Daughters of the Republic of Texas.

Edwards continued, “The battle gave birth to the Republic of Texas, and its story truly captures the spirit and pride the Lone Star State is recognized for around the world. We are honored to carry on the memory of the brave heroes who were part of this crucial event in our state’s history.”

In 1902 members of the DRT joined a group of dignitaries including legislators and a San Jacinto battle survivor in visiting the site to place temporary improvised monuments in a dozen locations where veterans identified important events had occurred. The locations included the camp where Gen. Houston lay wounded under a tree on the bayou, the same spot where Santa Anna was delivered to him as a captive.

After years of encouragement by the Sons and Daughters of the Republic of Texas, proponents succeeded in raising funds for the construction of the San Jacinto Monument which was completed in 1939. At 567 feet, the monument remains the tallest masonry column in the world. By comparison, the Washington Monument is 555 feet tall.

Acting on behalf of the Texas Veterans Association, in 1940 the Daughters of the Republic of Texas led an effort to place a large bronze sundial on the battlefield in memory of the nine Texans that lost their lives: Benjamin Rice Bringham, Lemuel Stockton Blakey, John C. Hale, George A. Lamb, Dr. William Junius Mottley, Mathias Cooper, Thomas Patton Fowie, Ashley R. Stephens and Olwyn J. Trask.

For more information on the Official San Jacinto Day Ceremony, contact Al Davis at 713-468-6771 [email protected]

For information about the Daughters of the Republic of Texas, visit http://www.drtinfo.org/. The Daughters of the Republic of Texas (DRT) will join area leaders and organizations in commemorating the 180th anniversary of the Battle of San Jacinto on Thursday, April 21, 2016. The ceremony will take place at 11 a.m. on the south side of the San Jacinto Monument at the San Jacinto Battleground (3523 Independence Pkwy., La Porte, TX 77571).

The event will include delivery of the San Jacinto Battle Report by Nancy Burch, the great-great-granddaughter of General Sam Houston; remarks from former member of the San Jacinto Historical Advisory Board Nina Hendee; performances by the Deer Park High School Orchestra and JROTC Color Guard; presentation of the DRT scholarship winners; an appearance by The Texas Army, the State of Texas Official 1836 Ceremonial and Reenactment Group; and much more.

The famous battle occurred 46 days after the fall of the Alamo in the late afternoon of April 21, 1836. During the battle a Texas army of 910 soldiers led by General Sam Houston overwhelmed the forces of Mexican President and General Santa Anna. When the fighting had ended, more than 600 Mexican soldiers were killed and more than 700 would be captured, while nine Texans would lose their lives. After escaping the battle, Santa Anna would be captured the next day, and three weeks later would be forced to sign the peace treaty granting Texas its independence as a nation.

“The Battle of San Jacinto was the turning point in Texas’ quest for independence and is remembered as one of the most decisive battles of the world,” said Betty Edwards, M.D., President General of the Daughters of the Republic of Texas.

Edwards continued, “The battle gave birth to the Republic of Texas, and its story truly captures the spirit and pride the Lone Star State is recognized for around the world. We are honored to carry on the memory of the brave heroes who were part of this crucial event in our state’s history.”

In 1902 members of the DRT joined a group of dignitaries including legislators and a San Jacinto battle survivor in visiting the site to place temporary improvised monuments in a dozen locations where veterans identified important events had occurred. The locations included the camp where Gen. Houston lay wounded under a tree on the bayou, the same spot where Santa Anna was delivered to him as a captive.

After years of encouragement by the Sons and Daughters of the Republic of Texas, proponents succeeded in raising funds for the construction of the San Jacinto Monument which was completed in 1939. At 567 feet, the monument remains the tallest masonry column in the world. By comparison, the Washington Monument is 555 feet tall.

Acting on behalf of the Texas Veterans Association, in 1940 the Daughters of the Republic of Texas led an effort to place a large bronze sundial on the battlefield in memory of the nine Texans that lost their lives: Benjamin Rice Bringham, Lemuel Stockton Blakey, John C. Hale, George A. Lamb, Dr. William Junius Mottley, Mathias Cooper, Thomas Patton Fowie, Ashley R. Stephens and Olwyn J. Trask.

For more information on the Official San Jacinto Day Ceremony, contact Al Davis at 713-468-6771 [email protected]

For information about the Daughters of the Republic of Texas, visit http://www.drtinfo.org/.

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