American Heart Assoc.

Shedding light on the importance of your local newspaper

by | Mar 19, 2020 | Opinion

This week the media is focusing on Sunshine Week. It is a time to celebrate a free press and what it means for you and your community to have access to public information.

Several weeks ago, I read a letter that should be shared with every community.

While the message in the letter is not typically associated with Sunshine Week, it is integral to the ongoing existence of this annual reflection.

This letter is from Wyman Williams, current mayor of Commerce.


“I am saddened … at the recent Commerce Journal headline indicating that our city would be losing a 130-year friend … the print version of our newspaper.

I am embarrassed … that I have been mayor of Commerce for over three years and have not prioritized explaining the unique role that print media could and should play in the most unusual marketplace that is Commerce, Texas.

I am embarrassed … that I have not explained to university administrators, faculty and staff the difficulties for local merchants to succeed in a market that has four months out of each year (three months in the summer and one month between fall and spring semesters) that population drops 40% to 50%.

Because 80% of university employees do not live in Commerce, merchants have great difficulty deciding how to invest limited advertising dollars to reach this lucrative market.

If the print version of the Journal was displayed in every dean’s office and departmental office with an expectation that every employee would benefit by becoming aware of not only the retail available near their workplace, but also the reports about the city, county, school district and hospital district board meetings that together support the work environment of all employees.

I am embarrassed … that I have not challenged the leadership of the chamber of commerce to support the Commerce Journal by buying a page a week for chamber news instead of competing with a monthly advertising supported newsletter.

If there were distribution on campus as explained above, advertisers would quickly recognize a reason to be regularly seen in the Journal.

I am embarrassed … that I have not brought together our campus storytellers, namely marketing and communications which includes our 100,000 watt KETR radio station, journalism instruction which includes the campus newspaper, the East Texan and our radio and TV instruction to visit with the ownership of the Journal to bring opportunity to our students to get real world experience covering campus and community news thereby improving interest in reading the newspaper.

I am embarrassed … that I have not informed the community of the incredibly entrepreneurial ownership of our newspaper. It is based in Montgomery, Alabama, and owned by the Alabama State Retirement System, which also owns the Robert Trent Jones Golf Trails.

They own similar newspaper operations in over 25 states and advertise Alabama tourism in each of those papers. For years our graduates have been hired by CNHI and have been given great opportunity to advance their careers.

I am determined … to bring these conversations about for the purpose of assuring CNHI that our community will support the Commerce Journal print version so it will be sustainably profitable.

In a town of 9,000-plus people, only 400 subscriptions are current. Our city is dependent on sales tax collected on taxable items purchased within our city limits. One and a half percent of the 8.25% collected returns to us. One percent goes directly to the city operating budget (almost 40% of the budget) and a half percent to the Commerce Industrial Development efforts (about $500,000 a year.)

Sincerely, – Wyman Williams Mayor.”

 Thanks for reading and I’ll share my thoughts about Commerce’s news desert next week.

For more stories like this, see the March 19 issue or subscribe online.

By Chad Engbrock • [email protected]

American Heart Assoc.

0 Comments

Related News

The Lawn Moore

The Lawn Moore

America really is The Land of Opportunity. Even if there’s only one opportunity, and that opportunity is cutting the grass.  Ashdown, Arkansas, was a pretty typical small American town in the 1960s and 1970s.  Kids weren’t just handed things. If we wanted...

read more
A myth understanding

A myth understanding

In the South, we believed with all of our hearts what we were told when we were children. Even if it was wrong. In the 1960s, the RCA color console TV my family had on Beech Street in Ashdown, Arkansas, could make you go blind. It could if you believed what our mom...

read more
On the road again and again

On the road again and again

Back in the 60s, some American college kids protested the Vietnam War, but mostly, they conducted sit-ins. Few protests were violent. Other American college kids would have contests to see how many of them they could cram into a Volkswagen. Today, some college kids...

read more
Aisle be seeing you

Aisle be seeing you

As a child growing up in Ashdown, Arkansas, we had two main grocery stores. Shur-Way and Piggly Wiggly. Or as my dad called it, “Hoggly Woggly.” A trip to the store was like each TV commercial had come to life. Advertising agencies at the time were very good at what...

read more
Just plane fun

Just plane fun

My wife and I are scheduled for an Alaskan cruise in the fall. By all accounts, it’s something to which we should look forward. I’ve been told the same thing about other trips, including a Vegas excursion that included a stay at a strip motel that still had beds that...

read more
Fixer Uppers

Fixer Uppers

Recently, I saw something I haven’t seen in many years. A young man driving a car he was fixing up. It was an older Mustang. By older I mean a 90’s model. The car had spots of primer, there were a few dents, and the exhaust system appeared to be loose. By John Moore...

read more
Who’s counting when it comes to columns?

Who’s counting when it comes to columns?

When this newspaper column began in 2014, my wife asked me a question. Wife: “How long do you intend to write this column?” Me: “Oh, I don’t know. I guess I’ll write 500 of them and then hang it up. This column is number 500. By Bob Moore For more stories about the...

read more
Don’t eat that

Don’t eat that

When I was a kid, I had to sneak around if I wanted to eat certain things. Now that I’m an adult and in charge, I still have to sneak around if I want to eat certain things. I miss the days when no one knew anything about gluten, trans fats, cholesterol,...

read more
Texas counties among nation’s fastest growing

Texas counties among nation’s fastest growing

Recent estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau indicate that six of the 10 fastest-growing counties in the United States from 2022 to 2023 were in Texas. According to the Texas Tribune, Kaufman County, just east of Dallas, led the list with a 7.6% increase in new...

read more
Read this. Build a stronger community.

Read this. Build a stronger community.

Saddened. Embarrassed. Determined. These three words evoke distinct feelings and emotions. In the context of an opinion piece we ran in the paper four and a half years ago, they described the aftermath of a community that lost its newspaper. After 130 years in...

read more
Subscribe 300x250 - Love